Advanced images shed new light on Titanic


From Hydro International

Newly released images of the Titanic wreck site have provided the first unrestricted view of the maritime heritage site.

These images supplement the collection of images published in the April 2012 issue of National Geographic magazine.

For the first time, both the public and marine archaeologists can view the wreck as if the ocean were removed from the site.

The image mosaics are part of a collection containing over 200 optical mosaics created by the Advanced Imaging and Visualization Laboratory (AIVL) at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

The AIVL, led by Bill Lange, used optical and sonar images collected during the expedition by a specially equipped remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and two autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), to stitch together the richly detailed, comprehensive views of the ship and wreck site.

The vehicles carried a combination of sonar used to make wide-area maps and advanced 3D camera systems used to conduct detailed forensic-type investigations.

Although the individual robotic systems provided new information about some pieces of Titanic, the fusion of the imagery provides for the first time a comprehensive view of the wreck site.

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