Pending treasures in the Caribbean sea

By Luis Sexto


Treasure hunters have outlived the golden dream of past centuries. Still in the test tube of utopias are, among other plans, the projects to find coffers and pitchers from the Cathedral of Merida, which are going rusty somewhere in the cove of Corrientes, in Guanahacabibes peninsula, in Cuba’s western end.

Like a pincushion where every needle points to a shipwreck, the Caribbean Sea still stirs up the tempting possibility of holding treasures that go dark against the bovine indifference of fish.

A map with the location of the shipwrecks that have occurred in five centuries outlines a broad area where wealth is uselessly lying in the seabed, blending in with legends, myths and the ambitions of striking it rich overnight.

Every now and then, bounty hunters from Europe or North America go through the basin of turbulence of this American Mediterranean [Sea] with an electronic flair, retracing the steps taken by others long before them, for when it comes to money there are no routes left untouched.

Dreams and adventures in pursuit of good luck are as insistently bred as man himself.

Treasure hunters have outlived the golden dream of past centuries. Still in the test tube of utopias are, among other plans, the projects to find coffers and pitchers from the Cathedral of Merida, which are going rusty somewhere in the cove of Corrientes, in Guanahacabibes peninsula, in Cuba’s western end.

Or they are looking forward to finding the right spot where the hulls of the [vessels] Concepción and Magdalena are crumbling, as these were galleons pierced by pirates in 1556 with tons of gold ingots, loaded in Panama, which are lying off the coast of Cape San Antonio, also in Cuba’s western region.



treasures Caribbean sea Cuba Corrientes Guanahacabibes peninsula Cathedral of Merida