Busy year for receiver of wreck

From Dive Magazine


The Receiver of Wreck said more than 1,500 items of wreck were reported in the UK during the last 12 months, ranging from water melons to 3m-long bronze cannons.  

The Receiver of Wreck said more than 1,500 items of wreck were reported in the UK during the last 12 months, ranging from water melons to 3m-long bronze cannons. However, tonnes of recovered timber from the Ice Prince, a cargo ship that sank off the Devon coast in January 2008, had not been recorded separately according to the head of the government body.

In her annual report, Receiver of Wreck Alison Kentuck said a total of 299 reports of wreck were received in 2008, a small increase on the previous years figures - 290 in 2007. Incoming droit (wreck) figures, however, have declined since a peak between 2000 and 2002.

As long as all of the material reported has come from the same site, there is no limit to the quantity of recovered wreck material that can be reported.

'2008 has been a very busy year for the Receiver of Wreck with large scale incidents such as the timber cargo from the Ice Prince vessel in January in addition to many other interesting smaller scale recoveries,' Kentuck said. 'The wide range of items reported to the Receiver illustrates the huge variety of goods transported by sea both today and throughout history.'

Under the Merchant Shipping Act 1995, all recovered wreck material, regardless of age, size or value, must be reported to the Receiver of Wreck. T

his includes all wreck recovered from within UK territorial waters and any wreck material brought within UK territorial waters.



Receiver of Wreck Alison Kentuck Ice Prince Devon coast Merchant Shipping Act 1995